Group Therapy: The Intangible Benefits for Acquired Brain Injury

Friendships after Acquired Brain Injury

Nancy, Felix, Ted and Alex* shared more than their acquired brain injuries. They were all isolated from friends after their acquired brain injuries. Socializing was too much work. Friends didn’t understand. Friends stopped calling. It was hard to initiate a conversation with someone new. We heard the stories again and again. They were different faces, but the same stories. They all attended group therapy to help with their communication disorders.

After Group Therapy

We heard new stories: “Group is one of my most important appointments”, “When is the next one?”, “It was really great”, “Do you have Ted’s number?”, “She inspired me because if she could do all that with all her physical problems on top of her brain injury, and with a kid, then I can do it too.”

Our clients establish a new sense-of-self linked with renewed abilities to interact successfully with peers. We have seen so many positive changes in our clients. They have developed relationships with each other outside of sessions. Clients meet before or after sessions to continue the relationships that began in the sessions. Recently Felix (an extremely shy person since his acquired brain injury) participated in a presentation that was made possible through a relationship formed through group. The other group member inspired and encouraged Felix to get involved. Ted obtained a bus pass for the first time ever, as a direct result of wanting to attend group independently. This goal was not one that Ted had ever expressed before. Alex plays in a band and now Nancy has become inspired to try to play guitar again, “Alex is really good and he learned after his brain injury”.

Group Therapy offers more than just Practice

Friendships aren’t made overnight and having an acquired brain injury can make that dynamic even harder. Group therapy helps build confidence by allowing clients to practice important skills in a safer environment, and provides emotional support by way of a client realizing that he or she is not alone. The skills to make and maintain relationships are practiced, but there is So. Much. More.

Do you need some help getting back into socializing? If so, check out our groups online, or call us to discuss your individual needs. We would love to hear your story and see which of our groups is the best fit for you.

*names and some details have been changed to protect our clients’ identities

BobiTychynskiShimoda-220Bobi Tychynski Shimoda is a Speech-Language Pathologist with more than a decade of experience working with neurological communication and swallowing disorders. She has worked in a variety of settings including inpatient rehab, acute care, community, and private practise. She is highly skilled in assessment, and innovative treatment approaches.

 

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